Month: February 2021

  • April is National Poetry Month

    first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore The Academy of American Poets established National Poetry Month in 1996. Their website is in celebration mode and lists 30 ways to engage yourself in poetry this April. Submit Your Good News Poem In celebration of poetry month, the Good News Network invites you to submit your short poem to share with our readers. (Just use the Submit link in the left menu.) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

  • Optimists Live Longer and Healthier Lives Says New Study

    first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Optimists live longer, healthier lives than pessimists, US researchers said on Thursday. In a Women’s Health Initiative study initiated by the University of Pittsburgh, women who were optimistic — those who expect good rather than bad things to happen — were 14 percent less likely to die from any cause than pessimists and 30 percent less likely to die from heart disease after eight years of follow up in the study. Optimists also were also less likely to have high blood pressure, diabetes, or smoke cigarettes. (Read the full report in Reuters) Photo courtesy of Sun Star  AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

  • Air Traffic Controllers Honored as Heroes for Guiding Newbie Pilot to Safety

    first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreFederal workers Lisa Grimm and Brian Norton were honored Monday by the National Air Traffic Controllers Association for guiding Doug White and his family to safety on April 12, 2009, when the pilot of their plane died during a flight.Talking on the radio was the one bit of knowledge that may have saved White’s life — and the lives of his wife and two daughters who were with him. The controllers could hear the panic in his voice. (READ the story in the Washington Post)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

  • Gesture of Sportsmanship for Down’s Syndrome Player in SC Football Playoff Game (Video)

    first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreWhile headlines swirl around a sports scandal of epic proportions on the college level, a high school football team quietly demonstrated the meaning of kindness during a championship game.Last Friday, during a South Carolina high school playoff game, a gesture will be remembered for its epic qualities of pure sportsmanship.The Myrtle Beach Seahawks were leading Hilton Head 64-10 with just a few seconds on the clock. The winning team decided to create an unforgettable moment for a player on the other team with Down’s Syndrome.(WATCH the video below, or read the story from WISTV.com)Thanks to long-time GNN supporter Kelly Lovejoy for submitting the link! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

  • Amy Adams Gives up First Class Seat for Soldier, Sits in Coach Instead

    first_imgE-Online says Adams was in Michigan the past month filming the superhero film, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.Now it’s “Lois Lane” who is the superhero, for one serviceman, at least.Ernest Owens boarded the same Delta plane and found his seat in coach, and realized that Adams would be sitting next to him for the flight. The two posed for a selfie that was posted on Twitter during the flight. Watch a video below with his and Hill’s reaction.Adams’ father was a U.S. Army Serviceman, and she told a reporter she’s “always wanted to do that”. ;Photo credit: Ernest [email protected] on TwitterAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreHollywood star Amy Adams tried to keep her kindness quiet, but an ESPN reporter overheard the actress giving up her first class seat to an American soldier, on her way to L.A. from Detroit.Jemele Hill witnessed the interaction and broke the news on Twitter.last_img read more

  • In a ‘World First’, Scientists Reverse Brain Damage in Drowned Toddler

    first_imgThe mother immediately pulled her daughter out of the cold 41º water (5ºc) and started performing CPR. The toddler was then taken to the hospital where she was given emergency treatment – and for two hours afterward, her heart didn’t beat.CHECK OUT: First Ever Quadriplegic Treated With Stem Cells Regains Motor Control in His Upper BodyThe toddler was resuscitated, however, and she stayed in the hospital, totally immobile and unresponsive to any stimuli. All Eden was capable of doing was squirming incessantly and shaking her head – she was unable to walk, talk, or respond to voices.Then, Dr. Paul Harch of the LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, started giving the toddler normobaric oxygen treatments.The treatments, administered nasally for 45 minutes twice a day, caused immediate and noticeable success. Eden became more alert and active with each session.RELATED: New Cancer Drug is So Effective Against Tumors, the FDA Approved It Immediately78 days after the incident, the family traveled to New Orleans where Eden was required to sit in a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber (HBOT) for an equal amount of time every day as her previous treatments.After just 39 days using the chamber, doctors found that all signs of muscular dystrophy and brain damage had essentially been reversed —a feat researchers now say is a “world’s first”.“The startling regrowth of tissue in this case occurred because we were able to intervene early in a growing child, before long-term tissue degeneration,” notes Harch. “Although it’s impossible to conclude from this single case if the sequential application of normobaric oxygen, then HBOT, would be more effective than HBOT alone, in the absence of HBOT therapy, short duration, repetitive normobaric oxygen therapy may be an option until HBOT is available. Such low-risk medical treatment may have a profound effect on recovery of function in similar patients who are neurologically devastated by drowning.”(WATCH the video below)Click To Share The Inspiring News With Your Friends (Photo by Eden Carlson Miracles)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreEden Carlson’s parents were told that their beloved 2-year-old daughter would most likely be a vegetable for the rest of her life – but, then, an experimental therapy reversed her brain damage.In February 2016, Eden’s mother was horrified to discover that her daughter had broken through a baby gate and drowned in their backyard pool.last_img read more

  • After Homeless Man Helps Get His Car Out of the Snow, NFL Player Brings Him to Tears With Thank You Gift

    first_imgAfter the tweet was shared thousands of times, Allen finally managed to get in contact with Cochran, who has never been to a Chiefs game before.Later in an interview, Cochran says that he “bawled” when he heard he would get to attend the game.MORE: Watch Bus Driver Offer Comfort and Resources to Homeless Passenger Escaping the Cold“All I was expecting was a thank you,” says Cochran. “It’s like a dream come true. I saw the message this morning, and I am not going to fake with you, call me soft … I started bawling to know he is a man of his word and he reached out to contact me.”(WATCH the interview below) – Photo by KSHBBe Sure And Share This Inspiring Story Of Kindness With Your Friends On Social MediaAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore “He wasn’t used to this weather. He isn’t used to this cold. He is from Texas,” Cochran told KSHB. “[So I] just pulled over, I went to help him, then he told me he was a Chiefs player. I didn’t know he was a Chiefs player. I looked at him as a normal person and hoped he would do the same for me like I did for him.”RELATED: Rapper’s Insistence on Featuring Homeless People in Music Video Results in Family ReunionThe driver was Jeff Allen, the offensive lineman for the Kansas City Chiefs. Not only that, Allen had been driving to the local stadium for his game against the Indianapolis Colts when his car got stuck.Thanks to Cochran, Allen made it to kickoff on time.Allen later took to social media in hopes of tracking down Cochran so he could thank him for his kindness with tickets to the AFC Championship game.Update: Despite the recent influx in people changing their name to Dave in the KC area lol, I was actually able to track down the Dave that helped me thanks to the power of social media and #ChiefsKindgom. Thanks for your kindness https://t.co/e4OkEg6AAw— Jeff Allen (@JeffAllen71) January 13, 2019 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThis story of a homeless man coming to the rescue of a distressed motorist is a perfect example of how good deeds can be rewarded in the most unexpected ways.Dave Cochran is a homeless man who lives out of his car with his dog and girlfriend in Kansas City, Missouri. They had been driving through the ice and snow earlier this week when they saw a few cars get stuck in the powder.Cochran took particular notice of a stranded driver who was stuck in a car with Texas license plates.last_img read more

  • Scientists Create Super-Thin ‘Sheet’ That Could Charge Our Phones By Harvesting Wifi From the Air

    first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreChristine Daniloff / MIT NewsConverting Wi-Fi signals to electricity with new 2-D materialsDevice made from flexible, inexpensive materials could power large-area electronics, wearables, medical devices, and more.Written by Rob MathesonMIT NewsImagine a world where smartphones, laptops, wearables, and other electronics are powered without batteries. Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have taken a step in that direction, with the first fully flexible device that can convert energy from WiFi signals into electricity that could power our electronics.Devices that convert AC electromagnetic waves into DC electricity are known as “rectennas.” In a newly-published study that appears in Nature, the researchers demonstrate a new kind of rectenna that uses a flexible radio-frequency (RF) antenna that captures electromagnetic waves — including those carrying WiFi — as AC waveforms. The antenna is then connected to a novel device made out of a two-dimensional semiconductor just a few atoms thick. The AC signal travels into the semiconductor, which converts it into a DC voltage that could be used to power electronic circuits or recharge batteries.RELATED: Surgeons Successfully Implant World’s First 3D-Printed Rib – and They Plan On Doing Even More in the FutureIn this way, the battery-free device passively captures and transforms ubiquitous WiFi signals into useful DC power. Moreover, the device is flexible and can be fabricated in a roll-to-roll process to cover very large areas.“What if we could develop electronic systems that we wrap around a bridge or cover an entire highway, or the walls of our office and bring electronic intelligence to everything around us? How do you provide energy for those electronics?” says paper co-author Tomás Palacios, a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.“We have come up with a new way to power the electronics systems of the future — by harvesting WiFi energy in a way that’s easily integrated in large areas — to bring intelligence to every object around us.”In experiments, the researchers’ device can produce about 40 microwatts of power when exposed to the typical power levels of WiFi signals (around 150 microwatts). That’s more than enough power to light up an LED or drive silicon chips.LOOK: Smart Caption Glasses Allow Deaf Audience Members to Watch Live Theater Performers DirectlyPromising early applications for the proposed rectenna include powering flexible and wearable electronics, medical devices, and sensors for the “internet of things.” Flexible smartphones, for instance, are a hot new market for major tech firms.Another possible application is powering the data communications of implantable medical devices, says co-author Jesús Grajal, a researcher at the Technical University of Madrid. For example, researchers are beginning to develop pills that can be swallowed by patients and stream health data back to a computer for diagnostics.“Ideally you don’t want to use batteries to power these systems, because if they leak lithium, the patient could die,” Grajal says. “It is much better to harvest energy from the environment to power up these small labs inside the body and communicate data to external computers.”MORE: Undersea Robot Just Delivered 100,000 Heat-Resistant Baby Corals to the Great Barrier ReefAll rectennas rely on a component known as a “rectifier,” which converts the AC input signal into DC power. Traditional rectennas use either silicon or gallium arsenide for the rectifier. These materials can cover the WiFi band, but they are rigid. And, although using these materials to fabricate small devices is relatively inexpensive, using them to cover vast areas, such as the surfaces of buildings and walls, would be cost-prohibitive. Researchers have been trying to fix these problems for a long time. But the few flexible rectennas reported so far operate at low frequencies and can’t capture and convert signals in gigahertz frequencies, where most of the relevant cell phone and WiFi signals are.To build their rectifier, the researchers used a novel 2-D material called molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), which at three atoms thick is one of the thinnest semiconductors in the world. In doing so, the team leveraged a singular behavior of MoS2: When exposed to certain chemicals, the material’s atoms rearrange in a way that acts like a switch, forcing a phase transition from a semiconductor to a metallic material. The resulting structure is known as a Schottky diode, which is the junction of a semiconductor with a metal.“By engineering MoS2 into a 2-D semiconducting-metallic phase junction, we built an atomically thin, ultrafast Schottky diode that simultaneously minimizes the series resistance and parasitic capacitance,” says first author and EECS postdoc Xu Zhang.LOOK: ‘It’s Not Quite the Ant-Man Suit’ But Researchers Discover How to Shrink Objects to 1000th Their Original SizeParasitic capacitance is an unavoidable situation in electronics where certain materials store a little electrical charge, which slows down the circuit. Lower capacitance, therefore, means increased rectifier speeds and higher operating frequencies. The parasitic capacitance of the researchers’ Schottky diode is an order of magnitude smaller than today’s state-of-the-art flexible rectifiers, so it is much faster at signal conversion and allows it to capture and convert up to 10 gigahertz of wireless signals.“Such a design has allowed a fully flexible device that is fast enough to cover most of the radio-frequency bands used by our daily electronics, including WiFi, Bluetooth, cellular LTE, and many others,” Zhang says.The reported work provides blueprints for other flexible WiFi-to-electricity devices with substantial output and efficiency. The maximum output efficiency for the current device stands at 40%, depending on the input power of the WiFi. At the typical WiFi power level, the power efficiency of the MoS2 rectifier is about 30%. For reference, today’s rectennas made from rigid, more expensive silicon or gallium arsenide achieve around 50 to 60%.The team is now planning to build more complex systems and improve efficiency.Reprinted with permission from MIT NewsPower Up With Positivity By Sharing The Good News To Social MediaAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

  • ‘Breakthrough’ Device Allows Doctors to Keep Livers Outside the Body for 7 Days Instead of Mere Hours

    first_imgAdditionally, injured cadaveric livers, initially not suitable for use in transplantation, may regain full function while perfused in the new machine for several days.LOOK: Bionic Pancreas for Type 1 Diabetes Gets ‘Breakthrough’ Designation From FDAThe basis for this technology is a complex perfusion system, mimicking most core body functions close to physiology. The device was developed by researchers from the University Hospital Zurich (USZ), ETH Zurich, Wyss Zurich and the University of Zurich corresponding study was published this week in the scientific journal Nature Biotechnology.“The success of this unique perfusion system—developed over a four-year period by a group of surgeons, biologists and engineers—paves the way for many new applications in transplantation and cancer medicine helping patients with no liver grafts available,” explained Professor Pierre-Alain Clavien, Chairman of the Department of Surgery and Transplantation at the USZ.Surgeon connecting liver donor to perfusion machine — Photo by USZWhen the project started in 2015, livers could only be kept on the machine for 12 hours. The seven-day successful perfusion of poor-quality livers now allows for a wide range of strategies, e.g. repair of preexisting injury, cleaning of fat deposits in the liver or even regeneration of partial livers.The Liver4Life project was developed under the umbrella of Wyss Zurich institute, which brought together the highly specialized technical know-how and biomedical knowledge of experts from the various institutions.RELATED: Simple Type-2 Diabetes Treatment With Low Calorie Diet is So Effective, It Reverses the Disease in Studies“The biggest challenge in the initial phase of our project was to find a common language that would allow communication between the clinicians and engineers,” said Professor Philipp Rudolf von Rohr, Professor of Process Engineering at ETH Zurich and co-leader with Professor Clavien of the study.The inaugural study shows that six of ten perfused poor-quality human livers, declined for transplantation by all centers in Europe, recovered to full function within one week of perfusion on the machine. The next step will be to use these organs for transplantation. The proposed technology opens a large avenue for many applications offering a new life for many patients with end stage liver disease or cancer.Reprinted from the University of ZurichHeal Your Friends Of Negativity By Sharing The Good News To Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreSwiss researchers have succeeded in developing a machine that repairs injured human livers and keeps them alive outside the body for seven days.Until now, livers could be stored safely outside the body for only a few hours. With the novel new perfusion technology, livers—and even injured livers—can now be kept alive outside of the body for an entire week.This is a major breakthrough in transplantation medicine, which may increase the number of available organs for transplantation and save many lives of patients suffering from severe liver disease or a variety of cancers.last_img read more

  • College begins year with mass

    first_imgWhen Saint Mary’s President Carol Ann Mooney addressed the crowd at the College’s Opening Mass on Wednesday morning, she stressed the importance of educating both the mind and the heart. “This is a community in which I see ample evidence of the presence of grace, and of the human capacity to accept that grace and pass it on in love,” Mooney said. “Having the will to serve, the heart to serve, is wonderful. But without the skills to do so, we are of limited help.” Nearly 700 students, faculty and staff congregated in O’Laughlin Auditorium during the Mass. “To truly answer the call of the Spirit, we need more than a good heart,” Mooney said. “We must also make full use of our talents … Whatever our educational or professional paths may be, we must develop the necessary competencies to meet the needs of our neighbor, our community and our world.” Mooney said events like the Dance Marathon, the 12 Days of Christmas project and Rebuilding Together are all signs that Saint Mary’s women possess those talents. Mooney encouraged the Saint Mary’s community to continue to work for others. “Grace, the gift of the Spirit, is available to each of us,” she said. “It is poured out for us. It is up to us whether we respond to it.” Fr. John Pearson, who presided at the Opening Mass, echoed Mooney’s thoughts in his homily. “[Saint Mary’s is] where students learn not just skills, but who they are and their relationship to God and the world in which they live,” Pearson said. He also called on the Holy Spirit to enter those areas of both faculty and student’s lives where they may not feel the most secure. “We call on the paraclete because … who are we elders to claim the capability and responsibility to guide these young people in these many layers of searching?” He asked. “And how capable do you students, wise and confident as you feel one day, and inadequate and lost on another day, how capable do you feel to figure out all these things in your life on your own?” While the campus of Saint Mary’s has changed quite drastically over the years since its beginning in 1844, Father John said one thing remains the same. “What has not changed is the hope that all of us who come to this place will leave it better prepared to make our world one in which the love of God can be experienced as powerful through the love of these students and the faculty and staff who are privileged to be their guides,” he said.last_img read more