Month: June 2021

  • Opposition to FDA’s Robert Califf grows as senator threatens filibuster

    first_imgPoliticsOpposition to FDA’s Robert Califf grows as senator threatens filibuster Senator Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) says he will filibuster the nomination of Robert Califf to lead the FDA. Drew Angerer/Getty Related: WASHINGTON — A growing number of senators are threatening to block Dr. Robert Califf’s nomination to head the Food and Drug Administration, including one who is promising an old-style filibuster on the Senate floor.Although the White House insists that President Barack Obama still has confidence in his pick to head the agency, the steady increase in the opposition — which includes Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders — suggests that Califf’s prospects for becoming the permanent head of FDA are getting weaker, not stronger.The latest threat comes from Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, who said in a statement Wednesday that Califf has too many ties to the pharmaceutical industry to address the prescription opioid abuse crisis throughout the country.advertisement Related: By David Nather Jan. 28, 2016 Reprints Other senators, including Sanders, have said they’ll put a “hold” on Califf, a procedural step that just prevents his nomination from coming to the Senate floor. But Manchin said he will read letters on the Senate floor from West Virginia families that are dealing with opioid abuse, a statement that suggests he’d actually hold up the proceedings if Califf’s nomination ever gets to the floor.“We need to change the culture of the FDA, and that will not happen if the person at the helm is not a champion who is committed to pushing back against the pressure to continually approve new opioid medications given the significant risks to public health,” Manchin said, noting that opioid abuse has “ravaged” West Virginia.advertisementcenter_img The complaints about Califf’s pharmaceutical industry ties might be one of the only issues Sanders and Manchin have ever agreed on. Manchin is one of the most conservative Democrats in the Senate, about as far from Sanders’ “democratic socialism” as one can get.But Califf is also drawing other opponents from across the political spectrum. Senator Edward Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, has said he’ll block Califf over the opioid addiction problem. Senator Kelly Ayotte, a New Hampshire Republican, told Bloomberg she’ll join Markey over the same issue. And Senator Lisa Murkowski, an Alaska Republican, says she’ll hold up the vote unless the FDA changes its position on the voluntary labeling of genetically modified fish.Califf, who helped establish Duke University’s clinical research center, has acknowledged that his studies have received funding from pharmaceutical companies. But he insists that they had no ability to change or hide the results, and the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee approved his nomination with no dissenting votes earlier this month.For now, at least, the White House isn’t backing down — and says Califf will be able to manage any conflicts once he’s in the job.“Obviously, the president and the administration have full confidence in the ability of our nominee to make the kinds of decisions that are in the best interest of the health and safety of the American people,” White House press secretary Josh Earnest said at a briefing Wednesday. “The president would not have nominated him to the job if he didn’t think that he would be able to effectively look out for the interests of middle-class families in that role.” Bernie Sanders says he’ll block Senate vote on FDA’s Robert Califf “Dr. Califf’s past involvement will have an impact on his effectiveness and leadership capabilities, and I cannot, in good conscience, allow his confirmation,” he said. Califf: I’ll never lower FDA’s approval standards Tags FDAopioidspolicyRobert Califflast_img read more

  • Obama administration wants $1.1 billion to fight opioid abuse

    first_img Related: There’s no guarantee that congressional Republicans would approve the money, especially since Obama is proposing to get most of the money from an automatic funding stream, a budgetary approach that many Republicans don’t like.However, Michael Botticelli, director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, said lawmakers of both parties have seen their communities hit by the epidemic and insisted that “there is a tremendous amount of bipartisan support in terms of dealing with the epidemic.”According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 28,000 people died in the United States last year from opioids like prescription painkillers and heroin, a new record for drug overdose deaths.The crisis has gotten attention from several of the presidential candidates, including Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republicans Jeb Bush, Carly Fiorina, and Chris Christie — though most of the candidates avoid specifics on how to deal with it. Related: WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama will ask Congress for $1.1 billion in new funding to help fight the opioid abuse epidemic, boosting the amount of federal money for drug treatment and strategies to prevent overdoses, administration officials announced Tuesday.Most of the money, which will be included in the budget proposal Obama will release next week, would support treatment for prescription drug abuse and heroin use — highlighting an epidemic that has gotten attention from lawmakers and governors in both parties. Tags Barack ObamaCongressopioidspolicy Opioid crisis fueled by prescriptions from family doctors and internists The request comes one day after the Obama administration said it would seek $1 billion in funding for a “moonshot” against cancer, another initiative that officials are seeking to preview in the run-up to the release of the budget blueprint next week.The federal funding bill Obama signed in December included $400 million in funding to address opioid abuse, a $100 million increase over the previous year but still nowhere the new investment the president is hoping for.If Congress approves the money, it would be a “significant investment in this fight,” Sylvia Mathews Burwell, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, said on a conference call with reporters. She noted that her home state of West Virginia has had some of the most severe problems with opioid abuse.She said the money would help close the “treatment gap” — 2.2 million Americans need treatment, she said, but only 1 million get it now. New funding requested by President Barack Obama would support treatment for prescription drug abuse and heroin use. Spencer Platt/Getty Images By David Nather Feb. 2, 2016 Reprints That money would come from a new, automatic funding stream, meaning it would not depend on Congress to act on it every year; it would only have to approve the financing once.Obama’s budget will also call for a $90 million increase to help the states expand programs to help prevent prescription drug overdoses, especially in the rural areas that have been hardest hit by the epidemic.advertisement Opioid crisis drives record number of US overdose deaths Obama wants $1 billion over two years, including $920 million to help states provide medication-assisted treatment for opioid abuse, $50 million in National Health Service Corps funds to help people go to doctors who provide substance abuse services, and $30 million to evaluate how effective the treatment programs are.advertisement PoliticsObama administration wants $1.1 billion to fight opioid abuse last_img read more

  • The elitist sheen at TEDMED makes some scientists uneasy. Still, they flock to it

    first_img A typical TEDMED talk, co-released on TED.com, receives an average of 500,000 to 1 million views. Psychiatrist Judson Brewer’s talk last year on breaking habits has chalked up 5.6 million views, and counting.“TEDMED reaches audiences around the world that none of us as individuals or organizations would necessarily reach,” said Dr. Jeremy Farrar, a tropical medicine expert and director of the Wellcome Trust, who spoke this year.“We have a responsibility to get off our benches and make people understand why we do what we do,” said Duke neuroscientist Kafui Dzirasa, who gave a talk on mental illness and treatment via electrical stimulation.And sometimes the connections can be lucrative: After her 2011 TEDMED talk on cracking the neural code of the retina, Cornell neuroscientist Sheila Nirenberg said she was approached by multiple venture capitalists. “All sorts of people said, ‘I know how to help you start a company. I know how to help you raise the money,’” she said.In the five years since, Nirenberg has founded two companies, one of which aims to start a clinical trial within the year for a prosthesis to restore vision.The TEDMED conference is all about presentations. And parties. TEDMEDPomp and profitInvestors led by entrepreneur Jay Walker, a founder of Priceline.com, purchased TEDMED in 2011 from the original founder of TED Talks.Walker has been running it for profit — but last week announced that it has been to converted to a nonprofit, now wholly owned by the newly formed TEDMED Foundation.That’s not to say the pomp and circumstance will be abandoned: “If we can help health and medicine be celebrated like we celebrate sports and entertainment, that would be great for all of us,” Bergin said.TEDMED defends its high ticket prices as necessary to support the speakers and pay for producing and distributing the talks. It also allows for a free live stream to teaching hospitals, medical schools, and other academic centers; this year, organizations in 120 countries tuned in. “We very much want those on the front lines on health and medicine to have access to this content,” Bergin said. By Megan Scudellari Dec. 8, 2016 Reprints HealthThe elitist sheen at TEDMED makes some scientists uneasy. Still, they flock to it Molly Ferguson for STAT Until recently a for-profit business, TEDMED does not try to hide its elitist sheen. You have to apply for the privilege of purchasing a $4,950 non-refundable ticket to the event. And that only covers the talks and the parties, not accommodations. A typical audience includes leaders from the worlds of industry, philanthropy, finance, health care, and academia.Such an atmosphere puts TEDMED — and its speakers — at risk of “losing touch” with the scientific community, said first-time speaker Dr. Charles Chiu, an infectious disease microbiologist at the University of California, San Francisco.Tight research budgets, for instance, “make it difficult to simply participate as a scientist,” he added. He noticed that government employees were conspicuously absent.Still, he’s glad he went.Indeed, many doctors and scientists who come to present their work here strongly defend TEDMED as an uncommon chance to rub elbows with potential funders who want to make a difference in health care — and an unrivaled forum to share science with the public. Speakers are not paid for their time, though many subsequently tout their talk on their websites or share it with colleagues and investors. Google’s bold bid to transform medicine hits turbulence under a divisive CEO Related: Related: This year’s program was built around the theme “What if?” — which Walker described during one of his four appearances onstage as the “two words of the scientific imagination.”Perhaps as a consequence of that theme, the conference was full of questions but few answers.Enthusiastic crowds gathered for several speakers who only tangentially touched on health, including a Darfur refugee poet, an eco-friendly mortician, and a fitness buff who traveled the world using only modes of transportation she could power with her own muscles.Several heavy hitters from the science community did take the stage: Chiu introduced the audience to next-generation genetic sequencing to identify infectious disease agents; longevity researcher Dr. Nir Barzilai outlined a clinical trial to treat aging with the drug metformin; and Genetic Alliance CEO Sharon Terry described her foray into citizen science and subsequent discovery of the gene causing her children’s genetic disorder, pseudoxanthoma elasticum.Dr. Sujey Morgan of Tufts University School of Dental Medicine gave a 12-minute talk on creating facial prostheses for patients who have experienced trauma, birth defects, or cancer. “It was like a dream come true,” she said.Only 300 doctors across the US work in this field, so Morgan jumped on the opportunity to raise awareness. “There are so many patients that need our help that don’t even know we’re out there,” she said. “This is the jump we need to make people aware of our specialty.”‘You can’t make a mistake’If speaking at TEDMED is exhilarating, it can also be terrifying.Invited speakers spend months presenting drafts of their presentations to TEDMED staff for editing, giving practice talks by Skype, and running through rehearsals with voice coaches. The stage itself is an intimidating circular platform flanked by video screens. Music pulses. Colored lights swirl. And a huge digital clock counts down the time on the back wall.“It’s stressful. You can’t make a mistake,” said Nirenberg, the neuroscientist. PALM SPRINGS, Calif. — You can’t beat the glitz at TEDMED.Hoisting purple cocktails at a private resort here in Palm Springs, 750 elite guests hobnobbed last week at the annual extravaganza — two and a half days of slickly produced talks about medicine and science, punctuated by parties and concerts.“We don’t think of TEDMED as simply an event,” said Shirley Bergin, TEDMED’s chief operating officer.advertisement Megan Scudellari Philanthropist Bill Gates talks public health, biotech, and the race for the White House It is, she said, a celebration of health and medicine.This year’s conference, however, was heavy on the celebration and light on the science. That focus on entertainment has sparked debate among serious scientists about the merits of the event — although, in the end, most of them say it would be foolish to pass up a chance to attend.advertisement Tags neurosciencephysiciansresearch About the Author Reprints “It is definitely not average training for a physician or scientist,” said Dr. Carla Pugh, a surgeon at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. “It felt like a one-woman Broadway show. There were things I would never talk about in front of my colleagues, that I talked about there.”In 2014, Pugh gave a TEDMED talk on the need for hands-on clinical training for physicians. (She also serves on TEDMED’s editorial advisory board, which helps identify speakers.)  After her presentation, a Fortune 500 company contacted Pugh about funding her research. “I’m very excited about it,” she said.As the conference wound down last week, Walker drew a standing ovation with a summary of the four themes he’d observed during the event: the power of story, of community, of passion, and of mission.There was no mention of health or medicine. With a rapper alter ego, a ‘loud-mouthed’ doctor takes on the medical establishment Related: [email protected] last_img read more

  • Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings

    first_imgPharmalot What is it? Log In | Learn More Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED By Ed Silverman Jan. 20, 2017 Reprints Ed Silverman What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. About the Author Reprintscenter_img Alex Hogan/STAT GET STARTED Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. @Pharmalot Hired someone new and exciting? Promoted a rising star? Finally solved that hard-to-fill spot?Share the news with us, and we’ll share it with others. That’s right. Send us your changes, and we’ll find a home for them. Don’t be shy. Everyone wants to know who is coming and going, especially with all the ongoing layoffs. Despite the downsizing, there is movement. Here are some of the latest comings and goings. Recognize anyone? Tags jobspharmaceuticalsSTAT+ [email protected] Up and down the ladder: The latest comings and goings last_img read more

  • Pharmalot, Pharmalittle: Biogen receives subpoenas over pricing and rebates

    first_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalot, Pharmalittle: Biogen receives subpoenas over pricing and rebates GET STARTED By Ed Silverman Feb. 3, 2017 Reprints About the Author Reprints [email protected] @Pharmalot What is it? Log In | Learn More What’s included?center_img Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Alex Hogan/STAT Ed Silverman Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot And so, another working week will soon draw to a close. Not a moment too soon, yes? This is, as you know, our treasured signal to daydream about weekend plans. And our agenda is actually rather modest. We hope to catch up on some work (yes, it never stops) and some reading, as well as take a nap or three. And what about you? This may be an opportunity to hit the pause button on the dizzying political developments and enjoy a football match. You could make time to reach out to someone special. Or if you feel brave, you could plan the rest of your life. Well, whatever you do, have a grand time, but be safe. Enjoy, and see you soon …Biogen received a subpoena in December from federal investigators about government price reporting, rebate payments, and co-pay assistance programs for four drugs, according to a filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission. The biotech also received a civil investigative demand for documents and information about relationships with entities providing clinical education and reimbursement support services. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Tags drug pricingInvestigationspharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

  • Even moderate drinking may speed brain decline

    first_img APStock In essence, “the more people drank, the smaller their hippocampus,” said first author Anya Topiwala, a psychiatry professor at University of Oxford. Consuming one more alcoholic drink per week was associated with a 0.01 percent decrease in the size of the hippocampus. For comparison, aging one year was associated with a 0.02 percent decrease.But keep in mind:The study only looked at a few hundred Londoners, mostly well-educated and middle-class, so it may not be representative of a wider population. Topiwala also pointed out there might have been “selection bias” in the sample — individuals had to get from London to Oxford in order to undergo the MRI scans and then spend an hour in a brain scanning machine and undergo other memory tests — which individuals who were alcohol dependent or had suffered brain damage from alcohol use might be less likely to do.The authors also noted that the changes in the hippocampus are only statistically significant for the right hippocampus, not the left hippocampus. Topiwala said she’s not sure why this is the case. The nitty-gritty:Researchers brought 550 Londoners to Oxford and ran them through an MRI machine. But these weren’t just any Londoners — they were government employees who, about every five years since 1985, had been filling out surveys about their health habits, including how much alcohol they consumed. This enabled the researchers to look for relationships between the individuals’ drinking habits and what showed up on their brain scans. Related: Quick TakeEven moderate drinking may speed brain decline Tags neurology Imbibing just a handful of beers a week is associated with long-term changes to a person’s brain, a new study finds — although the functional meaning of these changes is unclear.Why it matters:While it’s widely accepted that drinking too much is bad for you, conventional wisdom — and the government’s dietary guidelines — says that alcohol can be consumed in moderation. The US government defines that as one drink a day for women and two for men.This study, published in the BMJ on Tuesday, finds that drinking around these levels — 8 to 12 drinks a week — is associated with a few measures of cognitive decline that showed up on brain scans.advertisement The researchers found that moderate drinking over those 30-plus years was associated with degeneration and shrinking of the hippocampus, a region of the brain involved in memory and navigation, as well degeneration of the brain’s white matter.advertisement By Ike Swetlitz June 6, 2017 Reprints Related: A little alcohol may not be good for you after all Babies’ face scans detect exposure to low amounts of alcohol in utero What they’re saying:In an accompanying editorial, Killian Welch, a neuropsychiatrist at a hospital in Scotland, wrote that the study might change what we think constitutes a healthy level of drinking.“[The] findings strengthen the argument that drinking habits many regard as normal have adverse consequences for health,” Welch wrote. “This is important. We all use rationalizations to justly persistence with behaviors not in our long term interest. With publication of this paper, justification of ‘moderate’ drinking on the grounds of brain health becomes a little harder.”The bottom line:Alcohol has an effect on your brain, perhaps at lower levels than previously thought.last_img read more

  • ‘Benign sexism’ intrudes at a meeting of the world’s brightest minds

    first_img [email protected] Leave this field empty if you’re human: Make no mistake about the antagonist here. This isn’t the fault of a host or a white man or a conference. Indeed, we’d be well-served with more Aspen Ideas Festivals.But these remarks and microaggressions are proxy measures of the power and discriminatory culture permeating personal and professional spaces. What we need is for people to listen, to initiate conversations, to be OK with discomfort, to be honest when they mess up, and to challenge each other to do better and do differently.At the Aspen Ideas Festival, we didn’t quite get there.We did, however, learn something about ourselves that we hope we all take home.To the physician who raised your hand during our session on burnout, we apologize for our silence and thank you for your contributions to the field of medicine. And to Dr. Torres, thank you for your willingness to engage with us as we developed this article. We’re all in this space together, and grateful that when mistakes are made, we have an opportunity to learn from and with each other.Together, let’s break some more glass ceilings — and break the silence.Elizabeth Métraux is director of external affairs for Primary Care Progress. Nicolas Nguyen, M.D., is director of physician experience at Beth Israel Deaconess Health Care. Kelsey Priest is a fifth year M.D./Ph.D. student at Oregon Health and Science University. Tags advocacymental healthphysicians By Elizabeth Métraux, Nicolas Nguyen, and Kelsey Priest July 3, 2018 Reprints Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. Later, we raised our concern privately in a phone conversation with Torres, who welcomed what could have been a hostile exchange with both humility and interest. And as we spoke about his time in the media, military, and health care, and how those male-dominated cultures affected him, we also spoke about his daughter, now a medical school student, and how a culture of misogyny in medicine affects her. It was the conversation we should have had in Aspen — that we all need to have when confronted with sexism.A landmark report published this month by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine paints a damning picture of sexual harassment faced by women physician trainees and faculty. The 300-page report reveals that the academic workplace has the second-highest rate of sexual harassment (58 percent) when compared with private sector and other workplace environments.Of the many disturbing quotes from respondents to the National Academies survey, several underscored the systemic and perpetuating nature of the issue, like this one by a young resident: “I still don’t think that the prospect of being sexually assaulted was as bad as watching the next generation of sexual harassers being formed. I think that was the worst part for me.” Elizabeth Métraux Related: About the Authors Reprints [email protected] Please enter a valid email address. Which is why, when a question from a member of the audience — an experienced female emergency pediatrician — elicited a comment from moderator and NBC correspondent Dr. John Torres, also an emergency room physician, about her being “good-looking” — jokingly referring to E.R. doctors as attractive — we laughed it off. She continued with her question and the session moved on. And there we sat, in a room infused with well-worn complicity. No one said a thing about the comment.It was both ironic and fitting that in a session dedicated to the issue of burnout and the drivers of clinician dissatisfaction, Torres’ casual sexism did more to illustrate why so many health care providers — particularly women — feel isolated to the point of depression and suicide. Sexism, power, and a culture of silence is precisely part of the problem. Unbeknownst to him, Torres had hit the nail on the head with his comment.advertisementcenter_img @kelseycpriest In addition to their exposure to sexually harassing behavior as a training and occupational hazard, according to a Medscape report, female physicians have significantly lower wages than their male counterparts. Equally staggering is the minuscule percentage of women who have advanced to leadership positions within medicine compared to men. Similar discrepancies affect people of color and LGBTQ communities. So it seems that even in a field such as health care, which prides itself on evidence, science, and progress, we still miss the mark when it comes to gender issues, cultural diversity, and human equity.As women, people of color, and members of the LGBTQ community, we’ve learned to silently swallow micro- and macro-aggressions in professional areas dominated by straight, cisgender, white men. We’ve done this despite being aware that for all of these groups, discrimination in the workplace still afflicts approximately 40 percent of individuals. We bite our tongues — not only because we know that a flash of passionate conflict could jeopardize our physical and emotional safety and our professional reputations, but at the end of the day it just feels futile when our calls for action are ignored, buried, or dismissed.With the fear of being labeled as the woman, the minority, or the gay clinician, we “take the high road” by staying silent and pretending we don’t internalize it. As noted by an assistant professor of medicine in the National Academies report, we don’t want to be “labeled as the troublemaker.”After the burnout session at the Aspen Ideas Festival, a few folks in the crowd approached us to apologize for their silence. We, too, apologized. The collective silence had hurt us all.During the closing ceremony, a moderator again brought gender into the dialogue in his interview with Sen. Cory Booker. We had spent the prior 30 minutes listening to filmmaker Ava DuVernay and activist Ai-jen Poo celebrate the powerful role of women as catalysts for social change. After a question about Booker’s opinion of White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the moderator quipped that perhaps Sanders had “a crush” on Booker.Again, we all laughed. No one seemed to bat an eye at the inappropriateness of the remark. First Opinion‘Benign sexism’ intrudes at a meeting of the world’s brightest minds Kelsey Priest Nicolas Nguyen It’s 2018. We’re in the wake of the #MeToo moment. Increased reporting is exposing rampant sexism in medicine, media, and beyond. Women are now more empowered than ever to speak up in response to bias and harassment. One could think we’ve come a long way.And yet, for all our expressed outrage at widespread sexual harassment and our newfound “wokeness” about gender equity, we still find ourselves confronting sexism in what we perceive to be the most progressive, sophisticated spaces.That was driven home at the Aspen Ideas Festival, where two of us (E.M. and N.N.) were honored to be part of a panel discussing the growing epidemic of clinician burnout in the United States. Needless to say, the room was occupied with accomplished, highly educated individuals.advertisement [email protected] From left, Dr. Nicolas Nguyen, Dr. Victor Dzau, and Elizabeth Métraux participate in a panel at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival. Dan Bayer, The Aspen Institute/Spotlight Health Privacy Policy Sexual harassment is rampant in science — and current policies aren’t cutting it, landmark report finds last_img read more

  • Lessons Learned: How to engineer a data science career

    first_img [email protected] Lessons Learned is STAT Plus’ weekly column on careers in biomedicine. If you’re thinking of jumping from academics to industry/business or vice versa, join us each week for useful tips. And if you’ve recently jumped, send us a note: [email protected] Your experience might make a future column. Who we talked to: What’s included? Log In | Learn More Tags medical technologyprofilesSTAT+ What is it? General Assignment Reporter Kate covers biotech startups and the venture capital firms that back them. Molly Ferguson for STAT GET STARTED By Kate Sheridan Oct. 5, 2018 Reprintscenter_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED @sheridan_kate Kate Sheridan STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Lessons Learned About the Author Reprints Lessons Learned: How to engineer a data science career last_img read more

  • A guide to fetal tissue research: the controversy, the stakes, and the hunt for alternatives

    first_img By Ike Swetlitz Dec. 17, 2018 Reprints WASHINGTON — Two weeks ago, Will Burlingham, a professor of transplantation at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, got a surprise call from the National Institutes of Health: Would he like a little extra money to create more laboratory mice?“It’s like Santa came early,” Burlingham told STAT. “We’ve been advised that we need to gear up and hire people.” What’s included? A guide to fetal tissue research: the controversy, the stakes, and the hunt for alternatives Log In | Learn More A humanized “BLT” mouse is created by introducing human bone marrow, liver, and thymus tissues into animals without an immune system of their own. University of North Carolina School of Medicine What is it? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Politics Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags government agenciesresearchlast_img read more

  • Finch Therapeutics and three other startups got venture funding a year ago. Did it help them do what they said it would?

    first_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Finch Therapeutics and three other startups got venture funding a year ago. Did it help them do what they said it would? About the Author Reprints By Kate Sheridan Feb. 13, 2019 Reprints General Assignment Reporter Kate covers biotech startups and the venture capital firms that back them. Something Ventured [email protected] Log In | Learn More What’s included? Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDcenter_img This story is part of STAT’s quarterly series Something Ventured, which looks at early-stage startups. You can read the earlier stories in the series here. Biotech is an industry defined by splashy startups pitching groundbreaking, life-changing treatments — if only they had a bit more money to test them. But unless those companies eventually go public, finding out exactly what’s going on behind the scenes can be tricky. For outsiders, sporadic press releases may contain the only clues, even as companies continue to pull in venture funding or other investments. GET STARTED Kate Sheridan What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Hyacinth Empinado/STAT @sheridan_kate Tags biotechnologyBostoncancerdrug developmentresearchstartupSTAT+last_img read more